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Publications of Guykin Victor Alekseevich
Police activity, 2013-4
Guykin V.A. -

DOI:
10.7256/2454-0692.2013.4.6952

Abstract:
Police activity, 2013-3
Guykin V.A. -

DOI:
10.7256/2454-0692.2013.3.7944

Abstract:
Genesis: Historical research, 2013-2
Guykin V.A. - Korean Diaspora in Japan, Quasi-Labour Union of Soai-Kai and the Great Earthquake in Kanto pp. 89-142

DOI:
10.7256/2306-420X.2013.2.453

Abstract: Since 1916 when Japan experienced the industrial boom caused by the First World War a growing number of immigrants had been coming to Japan to work at factories and plants. In 1916 the Korean Diaspora consisted of 5624 people and in 1920 it reached 298000 people. Most of those people were simple workers with low competence and skills.Korean massacres after the Great Earthquake in Kanto in 1923 when thousands of Korean people had been murdered became some kind of a milestone in the history of the Korean Diaspora. It caused immigrants to establish their own social organizations and develop the quasi-labor union Soai-Kai and Zenko communist labor union. The present article is the first work in Russian historiography devoted to the Korean Diaspora in Japan. The author of the article also provides a complex analysis of activities performed by the quasi-labour union Soai-Kai that was created and managed by state and police authorities.
Police and Investigative Activity, 2013-2
Guykin V.A. - Slaughters of Korean People in Japan in 1923 and the Role of Police pp. 1-21

DOI:
10.7256/2306-4218.2013.2.782

Abstract: In 1910 Korea became part of the Japanese Empire. By 1925, 103 thousand of Korean workers who migrated to Japan consisted of builders (54.5 %), factory workers (28%), miners (8.3 %), servants and housekeepers (6.7 %) and dockers (1.8%). Specific mentality of Japanese people and how they perceived the world had a cetain impact on their attitude to immigrants. As the research of the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs held in 1925 showed, Japanese viewed Koreans as the 'lower race'.This article is the first one in Russian historiography to describe and analyze the reasons of the Korean massacres in Japan in September of 1923. According to the author, the reasons were: 1) Japanese government tried to transfer the citizens' discontent on Korean Diaspora; 2) even though anti-Korean attitudes seemed spontaneous, the author believes it to be the results of induced will of the Japanese government. The professor of the University of Tokyo Uesugi Sinkiti critisized the government's actions towards Korean Diaspora. He clamed that police actually circulated rumors against Korean people and arrested and killed many innocent people.
History magazine - researches, 2013-2
Guykin V.A. -

DOI:
10.7256/2454-0609.2013.2.7264

Abstract:
Other our sites:
Official Website of NOTA BENE / Aurora Group s.r.o.
"History Illustrated" Website